Scots page header

What we do & why

Braw Clan makes new theatre in Scots, inspired by the people of Clydesdale, and we tour it to rural communities in the south of Scotland. We bring world-class performers and powerful local stories to your village hall.

There's often English as well as Scots in our plays, as in Secret Wrapped In Lead. If you're not sure whether you can understand Scots, find out at ayecan.com. To find out what's on, have a look at our Productions page.

"When I was young, speaking Scots was not allowed. Seeing this play made me very happy."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"Scots is beautiful and very rich but at risk of being lost. It's important to nurture it. It's part of our identity."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"I wasn't sure before I came but I really enjoyed the story and hearing the Scots language."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

Scots page header

What we do & why

Braw Clan makes new theatre in Scots, inspired by the people of Clydesdale, and we tour it to rural communities in the south of Scotland. We bring world-class performers and powerful local stories to your village hall.

There's often English as well as Scots in our plays, as in Secret Wrapped In Lead. If you're not sure whether you can understand Scots, find out at ayecan.com. To find out what's on, have a look at our Productions page.

"When I was young, speaking Scots was not allowed. Seeing this play made me very happy."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"Scots is beautiful and very rich but at risk of being lost. It's important to nurture it. It's part of our identity."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"I wasn't sure before I came but I really enjoyed the story and hearing the Scots language."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

martin circle headshot

Martin Travers, Braw Clan's playwright and Creative Producer, on why he writes plays in Scots.

I fell in love with Scots on the hip of my Auntie Isobel.

Like a lot of Lanarkshire women born in the 1930s she left school at 14 and went to work in a factory. Her Scots tongue was always direct. Unfiltered. Armour piercing. Earthy and organic. And could be delivered in a swirling plume of laughter that was infectious. My baby brain soaked it up. Scots was my language. The language of the kitchen and the glen and of safety and love.

A language that lived in the air between people.

It was the language I spoke and the language I dreamed in. Then I was dragged to school.

Throughout my early life reading was never a joy for me. Written English was another language with horrible rules and impossible spellings that didn’t sound like the words my brain knew. English felt imposed on me. It made me feel stupid. Inadequate. “Speak properly!” reverberated down the corridors of my primary school years.

I went to a Catholic school, so for some reason we didn’t do any Scots - not even Robert Burns.

For years I thought Burns night was for red-faced whiskey-glugging golf bores wearing itchy tartan trousers.

At high school when we should have been reading John Galt we got Shakespeare and Trollope and, thankfully, the magnificent poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins. Hopkins led me to Dylan Thomas. Both men’s poetry connected

with something deep in me. The reel of life in me. The words they used and the order they put the words in was like listening to the rhythm of steam engines and crashing waves. Their fury and their flourish reminded me of the rhythmic blether of Scots I was baptised in as an infant.

I was fascinated by their version of English - it felt pagan and from the dark places in nature. As a writer, I owe as much to Hopkins and Thomas as I do to Burns, Robert Ferguson and Tennessee Williams.

My early theatre experiences came through reading plays. I fell in love with the big character-driven American plays.

And I’m still in love with them. A simple story told well is a thing of wonder. A great line is a great line forever.

It wasn't until later that I had the chance to read the works of Ena Lamont Stewart, Joe Corrie, Hector MacMillan, Robert McLellan, and Irvine Welsh. There are some wonderful world-class Scots plays out there but not enough in my opinion.

Braw Clan is here to make new, dynamic, dark and delicious plays that bring new audiences to Scots.

We want to get people excited about our magnificent language. And we want make work for Scotland-based actors that they'll be proud of.

Why do I write in Scots? It has the power to be tender, savage, hilarious and dramatically theatrical. And if I'm honest, it is a compulsion, an addiction, a black art. I want other writers to fall under its spell too. It's the language I still dream in.

I want our audiences to hear it in the air and sweat of every story Braw Clan perform for you. Come on the journey with us. Sit in the village halls of Clydesdale with us. Be as captivated by the power of Scots as we are. Be brave. Be in awe. Deil the fear.

martin circle headshot

Martin Travers, Braw Clan's playwright and Creative Producer, on why he writes plays in Scots.

I fell in love with Scots on the hip of my Auntie Isobel.

Like a lot of Lanarkshire women born in the 1930s she left school at 14 and went to work in a factory. Her Scots tongue was always direct. Unfiltered. Armour piercing. Earthy and organic. And could be delivered in a swirling plume of laughter that was infectious. My baby brain soaked it up. Scots was my language. The language of the kitchen and the glen and of safety and love.

A language that lived in the air between people.

It was the language I spoke and the language I dreamed in. Then I was dragged to school.

Throughout my early life reading was never a joy for me. Written English was another language with horrible rules and impossible spellings that didn’t sound like the words my brain knew. English felt imposed on me. It made me feel stupid. Inadequate. “Speak properly!” reverberated down the corridors of my primary school years.

I went to a Catholic school, so for some reason we didn’t do any Scots - not even Robert Burns.

For years I thought Burns night was for red-faced whiskey-glugging golf bores wearing itchy tartan trousers.

At high school when we should have been reading John Galt we got Shakespeare and Trollope and, thankfully, the magnificent poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins. Hopkins led me to Dylan Thomas. Both men’s poetry connected with something deep in me. The reel of life in me. The words they used and the order they put the words in was like listening to the rhythm of steam engines and crashing waves. Their fury and their flourish reminded me of the rhythmic blether of Scots I was baptised in as an infant.

I was fascinated by their version of English - it felt pagan and from the dark places in nature. As a writer, I owe as much to Hopkins and Thomas as I do to Burns, Robert Ferguson and Tennessee Williams.

My early theatre experiences came through reading plays. I fell in love with the big character-driven American plays.

And I’m still in love with them. A simple story told well is a thing of wonder. A great line is a great line forever.

It wasn't until later that I had the chance to read the works of Ena Lamont Stewart, Joe Corrie, Hector MacMillan, Robert McLellan, and Irvine Welsh. There are some wonderful world-class Scots plays out there but not enough in my opinion.

Braw Clan is here to make new, dynamic, dark and delicious plays that bring new audiences to Scots.

We want to get people excited about our magnificent language. And we want make work for Scotland-based actors that they'll be proud of.

Why do I write in Scots? It has the power to be tender, savage, hilarious and dramatically theatrical. And if I'm honest, it is a compulsion, an addiction, a black art. I want other writers to fall under its spell too. It's the language I still dream in.

I want our audiences to hear it in the air and sweat of every story Braw Clan perform for you. Come on the journey with us. Sit in the village halls of Clydesdale with us. Be as captivated by the power of Scots as we are. Be brave. Be in awe. Deil the fear.

Gripping stories, in Scots.

Braw Clan's actors work far and wide, performing for companies like Shakespeare's Globe, the BBC, ITV and Netflix. But Clydesdale is our home. When we turn up to do a play in your village hall, you better believe we're going to make it a night to remember.

Sign up for our fortnightly newsletter to find out what's on.

Please enter a valid email address.
Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.
Your information will never be shared. By subscribing you agree to our privacy policy.
illustrated badges deep green

"After watching the play, I feel re-energised about my village and sharing our stories."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"When I was young speaking Scots was not allowed. Seeing this play made me very happy."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"I wasn't sure before I came but I really enjoyed the story and hearing the Scots language."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

illustrated badges deep green

Gripping stories, in Scots.

Braw Clan's actors work far and wide, performing for companies like Shakespeare's Globe, the BBC, ITV and Netflix. But Clydesdale is our home. When we turn up to do a play in your village hall, you better believe we're going to make it a night to remember.

Sign up for our fortnightly newsletter to find out what's on.

Please enter a valid email address.
Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.
Your information will never be shared. By subscribing you agree to our privacy policy.

"After watching the play, I feel re-energised about my village and sharing our stories."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"When I was young speaking Scots was not allowed. Seeing this play made me very happy."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"I wasn't sure before I came but I really enjoyed the story and hearing the Scots language."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

illustrated badges deep green

Gripping stories, in Scots.

Braw Clan's actors work far and wide, performing for companies like Shakespeare's Globe, the BBC, ITV and Netflix. But Clydesdale is our home. When we turn up to do a play in your village hall, you better believe we're going to make it a night to remember.

Sign up for our fortnightly newsletter to find out what's on.

Please enter a valid email address.
Something went wrong. Please check your entries and try again.
Your information will never be shared. By subscribing you agree to our privacy policy.

"After watching the play, I feel re-energised about my village and sharing our stories."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"When I was young speaking Scots was not allowed. Seeing this play made me very happy."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

"I wasn't sure before I came but I really enjoyed the story and hearing the Scots language."

AUDIENCE MEMBER

clare marketing director circle headshot

Clare Yuille, Braw Clan's Creative Director, on why we put spoken Scots on stage.

At 16, I thought professional actors in Scotland were in Scots plays all the time.

I assumed they must be, because I was.

My amateur dramatics group, Biggar Theatre Workshop, had just performed Philotus, the oldest Scots comedy in existence, for the first time in 400 years. Adapted by Dr Jamie Reid-Baxter and directed by Ann Matheson, this riotous court play fizzing with politics, lust, scandal and merriment went along like a rocket, to huge acclaim.

If we were on stage in ruffs, bringing the house down with rhyming couplets, I thought it must be standard for professional actors.

I didn't realise that Clydesdale is a special place for the Scots language, and that I was very lucky.

After the success of Philotus, there was a sold-out production of James Scotland's The Sorceror's Tale, an adaptation of Robert McLellan's Linmill Stories directed by Ann Matheson and Kate Reilly, and a Scots language play about Marion Braidfute, the wife of William Wallace, for Lanark Players.

At the same time, The Brownsbank Trust, established to preserve the legacy of the poet Hugh MacDiarmid, was helping to bring ground-breaking Scots writers into Clydesdale's schools. We were taken to poetry readings and flytings, given books and dictionaries, and encouraged to write, speak and perform in Scots of all kinds, including for Higher English.

I got drunk on the sounds, rhythms, stories and humour.

Lanarkshire and Ayrshire words from my childhood, Jacobean words sizzling with power, bits out of Trainspotting.

I absorbed it all, dying to be in a Scots language play again. But by the time I was training to be an actor, it was clear that my experience of speaking and hearing Scots on stage was rare. It still is.

Almost no plays in Scots are put on in Scottish theatres.

Braw Clan is here to fix that.

When she heard a blackbird sing, my gran would say "it's throwing its heart to the sky."

That's what speaking Scots on stage is like for me as an actor. And when I hear it as an audience member, sometimes it's so beautiful, alive and strange, I don't know whether to laugh or cry. Even when I don't understand every word, they understand me. It's like being home at last.

Audiences in Scotland deserve the chance to find how out they feel about Scots language theatre. I'm proud to be part of that work, and I'm proud it's happening in Clydesdale.

clare marketing director circle headshot

Clare Yuille, Braw Clan's Creative Director, on why we put spoken Scots on stage.

At 16, I thought professional actors in Scotland were in Scots plays all the time.

I assumed they must be, because I was.

My amateur dramatics group, Biggar Theatre Workshop, had just performed Philotus, the oldest Scots comedy in existence, for the first time in 400 years. Adapted by Dr Jamie Reid-Baxter and directed by Ann Matheson, this riotous court play fizzing with politics, lust, scandal and merriment went along like a rocket, to huge acclaim.

If we were on stage in ruffs, bringing the house down with rhyming couplets, I thought it must be standard for professional actors.

I didn't realise that Clydesdale is a special place for the Scots language, and that I was very lucky.

After the success of Philotus, there was a sold-out production of James Scotland's The Sorceror's Tale, an adaptation of Robert McLellan's Linmill Stories directed by Ann Matheson and Kate Reilly, and a Scots language play about Marion Braidfute, the wife of William Wallace, for Lanark Players.

At the same time, The Brownsbank Trust, established to preserve the legacy of the poet Hugh MacDiarmid, was helping to bring ground-breaking Scots writers into Clydesdale's schools. We were taken to poetry readings and flytings, given books and dictionaries, and encouraged to write, speak and perform in Scots of all kinds, including for Higher English.

I got drunk on the sounds, rhythms, stories and humour.

Lanarkshire and Ayrshire words from my childhood, Jacobean words sizzling with power, bits out of Trainspotting.

I absorbed it all, dying to be in a Scots language play again. But by the time I was training to be an actor, it was clear that my experience of speaking and hearing Scots on stage was rare. It still is.

Almost no plays in Scots are put on in Scottish theatres.

Braw Clan is here to fix that.

When she heard a blackbird sing, my gran would say "it's throwing its heart to the sky."

That's what speaking Scots on stage is like for me as an actor. And when I hear it as an audience member, sometimes it's so beautiful, alive and strange, I don't know whether to laugh or cry. Even when I don't understand every word, they understand me. It's like being home at last.

Audiences in Scotland deserve the chance to find how out they feel about Scots language theatre. I'm proud to be part of that work, and I'm proud it's happening in Clydesdale.

We tell spell-binding stories, in your village hall.

You know how almost no plays in Scots are put on in Scottish theatres?

Well, what Braw Clan does is make new theatre in Scots, inspired by the people of Clydesdale, and we tour it to rural communities in the south of Scotland. We bring world-class performers and powerful local stories to your village hall so you can enjoy them with your family and neighbours.

In fact, someone who came to a Braw Clan performance said “After watching the play, I feel re-energised about my village and sharing our stories."

Pay what you decide, after you've seen the show.

Braw Clan's theatre tickets are priced on a Pay What You Decide basis.

There's no up front cost - you book in advance as usual, but without making a payment. After you've seen the show, you decide what you think it's worth. This removes any risk of paying for something you might not enjoy. If you haven't enjoyed the show at all, you don't have to pay anything.

All money collected (you can pay by card or cash,) helps Braw Clan make more plays, so we hope you'll give generously.

We tell spell-binding stories, in your village hall.

You know how almost no plays in Scots are put on in Scottish theatres?

Well, what Braw Clan does is make new theatre in Scots, inspired by the people of Clydesdale, and we tour it to rural communities in the south of Scotland. We bring world-class performers and powerful local stories to your village hall so you can enjoy them with your family and neighbours.

In fact, someone who came to a Braw Clan performance said “After watching the play, I feel re-energised about my village and sharing our stories."

Pay what you decide, after you've seen the show.

Braw Clan's theatre tickets are priced on a Pay What You Decide basis.

There's no up front cost - you book in advance as usual, but without making a payment. After you've seen the show, you decide what you think it's worth. This removes any risk of paying for something you might not enjoy. If you haven't enjoyed the show at all, you don't have to pay anything.

All money collected (you can pay by card or cash,) helps Braw Clan make more plays, so we hope you'll give generously.

Company

Martin Travers

Creative Producer

Martin is a playwright and producer whose work has been produced by NTS, Citizens Theatre, In Cahootz, Scottish Opera and Oran Mor. His plays include Whatever Happened to the Jaggy Nettles? which won Best Play For Young Audiences at the Writers' Guild Awards in 2022. Martin helped found the multi-award-winning WAC Ensemble, Scotland's first professionally supported, care experienced theatre group.

Clare Yuille

Creative Director

Clare is an actor, marketing consultant and youth theatre director. Her acting credits include ITV, BBC, The Royal Lyceum, the Tron, Vanishing Point, the Royal Exchange, Dundee Rep and Lessons Of The Hour by Turner prize nominee Isaac Julien. Her shop, Merry + Bright, has been open on Biggar High Street for 14 years. Clare is the founder of Indie Retail Academy, where artists learn to sell to independent shops.

Morven Blackadder

Actor

Morven Blackadder is an actor and musician. Her professional appearances include Lizzy Cratchit in An Edinburgh Christmas Carol at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, and Primrose in Secret Wrapped In Lead for Braw Clan. She attended the Royal Lyceum Youth Theatre and is a senior member and workshop assistant at Corn Exchange Young Performers. Morven also volunteers with Limelight Music, sings and plays the guitar.

Anthony Bowers

Actor

Anthony is an actor, shopkeeper and youth theatre director who's worked with the Royal Lyceum, the Citizen's Theatre, the Library Theatre, the Royal Exchange, Pitlochry Festival Theatre, Chichester Festival Theatre and Eden Court, in shows like Pressure, White Christmas, Oliver Twist and Great Expectations. His television and film credits include The Last Bus, Falling For Figaro, Outlander, Coronation Street, Girlfriends, Garrow's Law and MI High.

Gordon Dougall

Director, Musical Director

Gordon is multi-award winning director, artistic director, producer, composer and musical supervisor. He's worked in the arts for over 40 years and his credits include Bell Records, Warner Chappell Music, The Royal Exchange, Belgrade Theatre, MacRobert Arts Centre, Red Ladder, Royal Lyceum, National Theatre of Romania, Merlin Theatre Budapest, Parapanda Arts Lab Tanzania, Communicado, TAG, The Citizens Theatre, Wildcat and the King's Theatre.

Cristina Ertze

Filmmaker

Cristina is a filmmaker, animator and visual artist whose work includes Blank (Cannes Short Film Corner Selection), The Old Man and the Whale (Euzcal Zine Bideo Bilera Film Festival Selection) and Slay (Berlinale Talent Campus Selection) which granted her a mentorship with the film director Wim Wenders. She's Creative Co-Ordinator for Common Weal, producing, directing and animating all of their videos and films.

Joyce Falconer

Actor

Joyce was raised in Torry, Aberdeen, and graduated from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in 1991, after winning the Duncan Macrae Prize for Scots Verse. She enjoys an extensive theatre career, playing roles like Maw Broon, Titania and Jean Guthrie in Sunset Song. Joyce has many TV credits and has been the feature of three documentaries, but it is her role of Roisin in BBC Scotland's River City for which she is best known.

Jack Henderson

Sound Designer, Composer

Jack is a singer-songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist whose EPs include Sharkey's Parade and Nobody Gets Hurt. He's performed and recorded across North America, Europe and Australia, including multiple tours with Americana band Over The Rhine and rootsy Canadian outfit Cowboy Junkies. He's shared stages with Buddy Miller, Sarah Mclachlan and Ron Sexsmith, and performed with Patti Smith.

Hazel Henderson

Costume Designer

Hazel graduated with a distinction in Theatre Costume Interpretation from Edinburgh College. Her varied career includes making hats for the Cincinnati Conservatoire's production of A Love Of Three Oranges in Tuscany, catwalk outfits for Creative Stitches at the SECC, costumes for degree shows, dresses and props for Gala Day courts and Thankerton Fire Procession, and creating a giant squid for a production of Treasure Island.

Joyce Henderson

Company Movement

Joyce is an Associate Member of Complicité, a movement consultant, director and dramaturg. She assisted Deborah Warner at the Old Vic, the Barbican, National Theatre, ENO and Glyndebourne, and has provided direction and consultancy for the Aix Festival, Sky TV, Lyric Hammersmith, Birmingham Rep and the RSC. Joyce was Choreography Assistant to Toby Sedgewick at the opening ceremony of the London Olympic Games.

Linsey Johnstone

Stage Manager

Linsey graduated from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in 2006 with a BA in Technical and Production Arts and has worked in various stage management roles for companies including the Tron Theatre, the Citizens Theatre, Fire Exit, Visible Fictions and Fish & Game. Linsey has toured nationally and internationally with a range of theatre companies, including NTS, Birds of Paradise and the Macrobert Arts Centre.

Robin Laing

Actor

Robin has worked in theatre, TV, film and radio all over the world. His credits include The Slab Boys, Murder Rooms, Cadfael, Medea on Broadway, Edward 'Babe' Heffron in HBO's Band of Brothers, River City, Shetland, The Victim, Guilt, Stonehouse, The Gold, Outlander and the independent film A Violent Man. Robin is also a prolific radio and voiceover artist and was nominated for 'Best Actor' at the 2021 BBC Audio Drama Awards.

Pauline Lynch

Director

Pauline began her career in the role of Lizzy in the film Trainspotting. She's worked internationally in theatre, film, television and radio, with stints at the National Theatre, London’s West-End, Broadway, Singapore, China, Tasmania, Europe and the USA. She's the author of two novels: Armadillos and Wildest Of All, and is a playwright and poet. Other credits include The Young Vic, Oran Mor, The Gate, Catherine Wheels and Starz.

Fletcher Mathers

Actor

Fletcher enjoys a wide and varied theatre career, working with companies like the Royal Lyceum, Lung Ha, the Tron and the Citizens Theatre. Her credits include The 306 Day, Shift, The Reason I Jump, First Snow and Medea for NTS. Fletcher is Project Director for Limelight Music, delivering training and opportunities for people with impairments, and has been the on-train announcer for all trains in Scotland for 18 years.

Helen McAlpine

Actor

Helen is an actor and voice artist who has worked with the Macrobert Arts Centre, Horsecross Theatre, Fire Exit, Òran Mór, the Tron and Mull Theatre. Her TV and film credits include Bold Girls, Scot Squad, Outlander, Rillington Place and The Sopranos. Her recent voice credits include the UK edit of the Netflix animated series Ridley Jones and Mumfie. Helen won the Romantic Novelists’ Association Narrator of the Year award in 2022.

James Mackenzie

Actor

James works with theatre companies including The National Theatre of Scotland, Dundee Rep, The Tron, The Royal Lyceum, Stellar Quines, Mull Theatre, Pitlochry Festival Theatre, Dundee Rep and Òran Mór, on shows like Sunshine On Leith, Whisky Galore, The Drawer Boy and Rites. His TV credits include 10 series of the BAFTA award-winning Raven for CBBC, Molly and Mack for CBeebies, River City, Still Game, Taggart and Outlander.

Michael Mackenzie

Actor

Michael has worked for most
Scottish theatre companies, playing leading roles including Robert Burns, John Guthrie, Salieri and many panto villains. He recently finished a tour of 549: Scots of the Spanish Civil War for Wonder Fools. On television, Michael starred as Tarot in Ace of Wands in the early 70s, and has been in Cardiac Arrest, Taggart, Hamish Macbeth, Dear Green Place, Gary: Tank Commander, Still Game, Vigil and Karen Pirie.

Paul Rodger

Production Manager

Paul's projects include the YTAS annual multi-site festival in Edinburgh, Ayr, Aberdeen, Glasgow, Perth and Glenrothes, and all technical and production aspects of Lyceum Youth Theatre's shows for the National Theatre's Connections festival. He also managed interdisciplinary projects involving Balerno High, Leith Academy, Wester Hailes Education Centre, Currie High School and South Queensferry High School.

Martin Docherty

Actor

Martin is a prolific theatre actor whose appearances include the Finborough, the Citizens Theatre and the Traverse. He recently starred in Moorcroft for the Tron / National Theatre of Scotland. His TV and film credits include: Dear Green Place, One Night In Emergency, Case Histories, Outlander, Cloud Atlas, Filth and Country Music. A documentary featuring Martin called Marty Goes To Hollywood won a New Talent BAFTA.

Dani Heron

Actor

Dani's many theatre appearances include the Vault Festival, National Theatre / Edinburgh Festival Theatre, the Royal Lyceum, Birmingham Rep, The Citizens Theatre, The National Theatre of Scotland and London's Westend, in shows like The James Plays, Rebus, Long Shadows and Peter Gynt, Sugar Coat, The Venetian Twins and Chariots of Fire. Her TV and film credits include Casualty, Armchair Detectives, Skin Deep, I Am Me and Rat Trap.

Company

Martin Travers

Creative Producer

Martin is a playwright and producer whose work has been produced by NTS, Citizens Theatre, In Cahootz, Scottish Opera and Oran Mor. His plays include Whatever Happened to the Jaggy Nettles? which won Best Play For Young Audiences at the Writers' Guild Awards in 2022. Martin helped found the multi-award-winning WAC Ensemble, Scotland's first professionally supported, care experienced theatre group.

Clare Yuille

Creative Director

Clare is an actor, marketing consultant and youth theatre director. Her acting credits include ITV, BBC, The Royal Lyceum, the Tron, Vanishing Point, the Royal Exchange, Dundee Rep and Lessons Of The Hour by Turner prize nominee Isaac Julien. Her shop, Merry + Bright, has been open on Biggar High Street for 14 years. Clare is the founder of Indie Retail Academy, where artists learn to sell to independent shops.

Morven Blackadder

Actor

Morven Blackadder is an actor and musician. Her professional appearances include Lizzy Cratchit in An Edinburgh Christmas Carol at the Royal Lyceum Theatre, and Primrose in Secret Wrapped In Lead for Braw Clan. She attended the Royal Lyceum Youth Theatre and is a senior member and workshop assistant at Corn Exchange Young Performers. Morven also volunteers with Limelight Music, sings and plays the guitar.

Anthony Bowers

Actor

Anthony is an actor and youth theatre director who's worked with the Royal Lyceum, the Citizen's Theatre, the Library Theatre, the Royal Exchange, Pitlochry Festival Theatre, Chichester Festival Theatre and Eden Court, in shows like Pressure, White Christmas, Oliver Twist and Great Expectations. His television and film credits include The Last Bus, Falling For Figaro, Outlander, Coronation Street, Girlfriends, Garrow's Law and MI High.

Gordon Dougall

Director, Musical Director

Gordon is multi-award winning director, artistic director, producer, composer and musical supervisor. He's worked in the arts for over 40 years and his credits include Bell Records, Warner Chappell Music, The Royal Exchange, Belgrade Theatre, MacRobert Arts Centre, Red Ladder, Royal Lyceum, National Theatre of Romania, Merlin Theatre Budapest, Parapanda Arts Lab Tanzania, Communicado, TAG, The Citizens Theatre, Wildcat and the King's Theatre.

Cristina Ertze

Filmmaker

Cristina is a filmmaker, animator and visual artist whose work includes Blank (Cannes Short Film Corner Selection), The Old Man and the Whale (Euzcal Zine Bideo Bilera Film Festival Selection) and Slay (Berlinale Talent Campus Selection) which granted her a mentorship with the film director Wim Wenders. She's Creative Co-Ordinator for Common Weal, producing, directing and animating all of their videos and films.

Joyce Falconer

Actor

Joyce was raised in Torry, Aberdeen, and graduated from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in 1991, after winning the Duncan Macrae Prize for Scots Verse. She enjoys an extensive theatre career, playing roles like Maw Broon, Titania and Jean Guthrie in Sunset Song. Joyce has many TV credits and has been the feature of three documentaries, but it is her role of Roisin in BBC Scotland's River City for which she is best known.

Jack Henderson

Sound Designer, Composer

Jack is a singer-songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist whose EPs include Sharkey's Parade and Nobody Gets Hurt. He's performed and recorded across North America, Europe and Australia, including multiple tours with Americana band Over The Rhine and rootsy Canadian outfit Cowboy Junkies. He's shared stages with Buddy Miller, Sarah Mclachlan and Ron Sexsmith, and performed with Patti Smith.

Hazel Henderson

Costume Designer

Hazel graduated with a distinction in Theatre Costume Interpretation from Edinburgh College. Her varied career includes making hats for the Cincinnati Conservatoire's production of A Love Of Three Oranges in Tuscany, catwalk outfits for Creative Stitches at the SECC, costumes for degree shows, dresses and props for Gala Day courts and Thankerton Fire Procession, and creating a giant squid for a production of Treasure Island.

Joyce Henderson

Company Movement

Joyce is an Associate Member of Complicité, a movement consultant, director and dramaturg. She assisted Deborah Warner at the Old Vic, the Barbican, National Theatre, ENO and Glyndebourne, and has provided direction and consultancy for the Aix Festival, Sky TV, Lyric Hammersmith, Birmingham Rep and the RSC. Joyce was Choreography Assistant to Toby Sedgewick at the opening ceremony of the London Olympic Games.

Linsey Johnstone

Stage Manager

Linsey graduated from the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland in 2006 with a BA in Technical and Production Arts and has worked in various stage management roles for companies including the Tron Theatre, the Citizens Theatre, Fire Exit, Visible Fictions and Fish & Game. Linsey has toured nationally and internationally with a range of theatre companies, including NTS, Birds of Paradise and the Macrobert Arts Centre.

Robin Laing

Actor

Robin has worked in theatre, TV, film and radio all over the world. His credits include The Slab Boys, Murder Rooms, Cadfael, Medea on Broadway, Edward 'Babe' Heffron in HBO's Band of Brothers, River City, Shetland, The Victim, Guilt, Stonehouse, The Gold, Outlander and the independent film A Violent Man. Robin is also a prolific radio and voiceover artist and was nominated for 'Best Actor' at the 2021 BBC Audio Drama Awards.

Pauline Lynch

Director

Pauline began her career in the role of Lizzy in the film Trainspotting. She's worked internationally in theatre, film, television and radio, with stints at the National Theatre, London’s West-End, Broadway, Singapore, China, Tasmania, Europe and the USA. She's the author of two novels: Armadillos and Wildest Of All, and is a playwright and poet. Other credits include The Young Vic, Oran Mor, The Gate, Catherine Wheels and Starz.

Fletcher Mathers

Actor

Fletcher enjoys a wide and varied theatre career, working with companies like the Royal Lyceum, Lung Ha, the Tron and the Citizens Theatre. Her credits include The 306 Day, Shift, The Reason I Jump, First Snow and Medea for NTS. Fletcher is Project Director for Limelight Music, delivering training and opportunities for people with impairments, and has been the on-train announcer for all trains in Scotland for 18 years.

Helen McAlpine

Actor

Helen is an actor and voice artist who has worked with the Macrobert Arts Centre, Horsecross Theatre, Fire Exit, Òran Mór, the Tron and Mull Theatre. Her TV and film credits include Bold Girls, Scot Squad, Outlander, Rillington Place and The Sopranos. Her recent voice credits include the UK edit of the Netflix animated series Ridley Jones and Mumfie. Helen won the Romantic Novelists’ Association Narrator of the Year award in 2022.

James Mackenzie

Actor

James works with theatre companies including The National Theatre of Scotland, Dundee Rep, The Tron, The Royal Lyceum, Stellar Quines, Mull Theatre, Pitlochry Festival Theatre, Dundee Rep and Òran Mór, on shows like Sunshine On Leith, Whisky Galore, The Drawer Boy and Rites. His TV credits include 10 series of the BAFTA award-winning Raven for CBBC, Molly and Mack for CBeebies, River City, Still Game, Taggart and Outlander.

Michael Mackenzie

Actor

Michael has worked for most
Scottish theatre companies, playing leading roles including Robert Burns, John Guthrie, Salieri and many panto villains. He recently finished a tour of 549: Scots of the Spanish Civil War for Wonder Fools. On television, Michael starred as Tarot in Ace of Wands in the early 70s, and has been in Cardiac Arrest, Taggart, Hamish Macbeth, Dear Green Place, Gary: Tank Commander, Still Game, Vigil and Karen Pirie.

Paul Rodger

Production Manager

Paul's projects include the YTAS annual multi-site festival in Edinburgh, Ayr, Aberdeen, Glasgow, Perth and Glenrothes, and all technical and production aspects of Lyceum Youth Theatre's shows for the National Theatre's Connections festival. He also managed interdisciplinary projects involving Balerno High, Leith Academy, Wester Hailes Education Centre, Currie High School and South Queensferry High School.

Martin Docherty

Actor

Martin is a prolific theatre actor whose appearances include the Finborough, the Citizens Theatre and the Traverse. He recently starred in Moorcroft for the Tron / National Theatre of Scotland. His TV and film credits include: Dear Green Place, One Night In Emergency, Case Histories, Outlander, Cloud Atlas, Filth and Country Music. A documentary featuring Martin called Marty Goes To Hollywood won a New Talent BAFTA.

Dani Heron

Actor

Dani's many theatre appearances include the Vault Festival, National Theatre / Edinburgh Festival Theatre, the Royal Lyceum, Birmingham Rep, The Citizens Theatre, The National Theatre of Scotland and London's Westend, in shows like The James Plays, Rebus, Long Shadows and Peter Gynt, Sugar Coat, The Venetian Twins and Chariots of Fire. Her TV and film credits include Casualty, Armchair Detectives, Skin Deep, I Am Me and Rat Trap.

Board

Dr Michael Dempster

Evelyn Hunter

Aileen Campbell

Martin Travers

Guy Hollands

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